Getmedicin.org

Promethazine





Promethazine

01/18/2015
05:15 | Author: Sarah Gray

Promethazine
Promethazine

Promethazine is a phenothiazine that possesses antihistamine, sedative, anti-emetic, and anticholinergic effects. Unlike other drugs in its class, it is not used as.

Promethazine is a phenothiazine that possesses antihistamine, sedative, anti-emetic, and anticholinergic effects. Unlike other drugs in its class, it is not used as an anti-psychotic. Promethazine can be used in endoscopic sedation as an adjunct to benzodiazepines and narcotics for hard-to-sedate patients who cannot be given droperidol. However, promethazine may produce a longer sedative effect than diphenhydramine, also used for this purpose. Other clinical uses for promethazine include the management of allergic reactions and anaphylaxis, treatment of post-operative nausea and vomiting, and as an adjuvant for post-operative pain.

Promethazine Dosing for Endoscopic Sedation Adult Pediatric*

Cohen LB, DeLegge MH, Aisenberg J, Brill JV, Inadomi JM, et al.

Comments (1)Read more



Promethazine - UpToDate

01/18/2015
03:30 | Author: Alex Watson

Promethazine
Promethazine - UpToDate

Your UpToDate subscription is risk-free. If you are not compley satisfied, simply cancel within 60 days for a full refund in US dollars.

Already a subscriber? Log in here.

An UpToDate subscription provides unlimited online access to over 10000 topics in over 20 specialties. With UpToDate, you can answer questions quickly, increase your clinical knowledge and improve patient care. Your subscription includes:

Not a subscriber? Subscribe now for immediate access.

This content is only available to UpToDate subscribers. Please log in or subscribe to gain access.

Comments (0)

DrugBank Promethazine (DB01069)

01/18/2015
01:05 | Author: Sarah Gray

Promethazine
DrugBank Promethazine (DB01069)

Phenergan VC Expectorant Syrup, Phenylephrine hydrochloride + Potassium guaiacol sulphonate + Promethazine hydrochloride.

A phenothiazine derivative with histamine H1-blocking, antimuscarinic, and sedative properties. It is used as an antiallergic, in pruritus, for motion sickness and sedation, and also in animals. Hepatic DrugSyn.org Kind: protein Organism: Human Pharmacological action: yes Actions: antagonist Kind: protein Organism: Human Pharmacological action: unknown Actions: antagonist Kind: protein Organism: Human Pharmacological action: unknown Actions: antagonist Kind: protein Organism: Human Pharmacological action: unknown Actions: antagonist Kind: protein Organism: Human Pharmacological action: unknown Actions: antagonist Kind: protein Organism: Human Pharmacological action: unknown Actions: antagonist Kind: protein Organism: Human Pharmacological action: unknown Actions: antagonist Kind: protein Organism: Human Pharmacological action: unknown Actions: unknown Kind: protein Organism: Human Pharmacological action: unknown Actions: antagonist Kind: protein Organism: Human Pharmacological action: unknown Actions: inhibitor Kind: protein Organism: Human Pharmacological action: unknown Actions: substrate inhibitor Kind: protein Organism: Human Pharmacological action: unknown Actions: substrate Kind: protein Organism: Human Pharmacological action: unknown Actions: inhibitor Kind: protein Organism: Human Pharmacological action: unknown Actions: inhibitor.

Comments (0)

Promethazine Drug Information Provided by Lexi-Comp - The Merck

01/18/2015
01:20 | Author: Alex Watson

Promethazine
Promethazine Drug Information Provided by Lexi-Comp - The Merck

Excretion in breast milk unknown/not recommended.

Preoperative analgesia/hypnotic adjunct: Children ≥2 years: I.M., I.V.: 1.1 mg/kg in combination with an analgesic or hypnotic (at reduced dosage) and with an atropine-like agent (at appropriate dosage). Note: Promethazine dosage should not exceed half of suggested adult dosage.

• Serious tissue injury: : Promethazine injection can cause severe tissue injury (including gangrene) regardless of the route of administration. Tissue irritation and damage may result from perivascular extravasation, unintentional intra-arterial administration, and intraneuronal or perineuronal infiltration.

Comments (4)Read more