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Chemotherapy side effects





Chemotherapy Side Effects Sheets - National Cancer Institute

9/19/2014
02:15 | Author: Sarah Gray

Chemotherapy side effects
Chemotherapy Side Effects Sheets - National Cancer Institute

Chemotherapy fact sheets with clear medical advice from doctors and nurses, and practical tips from patients to help you manage side effects.

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Side Effects of Chemotherapy

7/18/2014
12:10 | Author: Alex Watson

Chemotherapy side effects
Side Effects of Chemotherapy

This is the third article in a three-part series, and it describes side effects of chemotherapy. The other articles in this series provide an overview of chemotherapy.

Common side effects of chemotherapy.

These conditions can be treated with medications that stimulate the bone marrow to make more blood-forming cells that develop into RBCs, WBCs, and plaets. Learn more about managing anemia, infection, and thrombocytopenia.

Doctors and scientists are continually working to identify new drugs, methods of administering (giving) chemotherapy, and combinations of existing treatments that have fewer side effects. As a result, many types of chemotherapy are easier to tolerate than medications used even a few years ago.

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Chemo side effects - American Cancer Society

5/17/2014
02:15 | Author: Sarah Gray

Chemotherapy side effects
Chemo side effects - American Cancer Society

What causes side effects? Cancer cells tend to grow fast, and chemo drugs kill fast-growing cells. But because these drugs travel throughout.

The normal cells most likely to be damaged by chemo are blood-forming cells in the bone marrow; hair follicles; and cells in the mouth, digestive tract, and reproductive system. Some chemo drugs can damage cells in the heart, kidneys, bladder, lungs, and nervous system. In some cases, medicines can be given with the chemo to help protect the body’s normal cells.

Many side effects go away fairly quickly, but some may take months or even years to compley go away. Sometimes the side effects can last a lifetime, such as when chemo causes long-term damage to the heart, lungs, kidneys, or reproductive organs. Certain types of chemo sometimes cause delayed effects, such as a second cancer that may show up many years later.

Most people worry about whether they will have side effects from chemo, and, if so, what they’ll be like. Here’s a review of some of the more common side effects caused by chemotherapy. We also share some tips on how you can manage them.

Most side effects slowly go away after treatment ends because the healthy cells recover over time. The time it takes to get over some side effects and regain energy varies from person to person. It depends on many factors, including your overall health and the drugs you were given.

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People often become discouraged about how long their treatment lasts or the side effects they have. If you feel this way, talk to your doctor. You may be able to change your medicine or treatment schedule. Your doctor or nurse also may be able to suggest ways to reduce any pain and discomfort you have.

Cancer cells tend to grow fast, and chemo drugs kill fast-growing cells. But because these drugs travel throughout the body, they can affect normal, healthy cells that are fast-growing, too. Damage to healthy cells causes side effects. Side effects are not always as bad as you might expect, but many people worry about this part of cancer treatment.

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19 Common Side Effects of Chemotherapy - Healthline

3/16/2014
04:00 | Author: Alex Watson

Chemotherapy side effects
19 Common Side Effects of Chemotherapy - Healthline

Chemotherapy drugs kill rapidly growing cancer cells but can also harm perfectly healthy cells, causing side effects throughout the body.

Chemo can lower your white blood cell count, which results in neutropenia. White blood cells play an important role in the immune system: they help fight infection and ward off illness. Symptoms aren’t always obvious, but a low white blood cell count raises the risk of infection and illness. People with an immune system weakened by chemotherapy must take precautions to avoid exposure to viruses, bacteria, and other germs.

Red urine isn’t necessarily a problem—it may just be certain chemotherapy drugs working their way out of your system.

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Understanding and Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects

1/15/2014
06:35 | Author: Sarah Gray

Chemotherapy side effects
Understanding and Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects

Chemotherapy side effects include nausea, vomiting, fatigue, neuropathy, neutropenia, diarrhea, constipation, chemobrain, hair loss and mouth.

Each person with cancer reacts differently to chemotherapy and its potential side effects. Fortunay, doctors now have ways to reduce and even prevent these side effects. In this booklet, you’ll find practical information on managing side effects from chemotherapy so that your treatment goes as smoothly as possible.

• Be sure that you fully understand your doctor’s and nurse’s instructions for taking anti-nausea medicines.

NK-1 inhibitors. This is the newest class of medicines to prevent CINV.

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