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Drug reactions





Drug Reactions MedlinePlus

9/14/2014
02:15 | Author: Sarah Gray

Drug reactions
Drug Reactions MedlinePlus

Interactions can change the actions of one or both drugs. The drugs might not work, or you could get side effects. Side effects are unwanted effects caused by the.

One problem is interactions, which may occur between.

Side effects are unwanted effects caused by the drugs. Most are mild, such as a stomach aches or drowsiness, and go away after you stop taking the drug. Others can be more serious.

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Interactions can change the actions of one or both drugs. The drugs might not work, or you could get side effects.

When you start a new prescription or over-the-counter medication, make sure you understand how to take it correctly. Know which other medications and foods you need to avoid. Ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

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Drug allergies are another type of reaction. They can be mild or life-threatening. Skin reactions, such as hives and rashes, are the most common type.

References and abstracts from MEDLINE/PubMed (National Library of Medicine).

Most of the time, medicines make our lives better. They reduce aches and pains, fight infections, and control problems such as high blood pressure or diabetes. But medicines can also cause unwanted reactions.

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Drug Reactions

7/13/2014
12:10 | Author: Alex Watson

Drug reactions
Drug Reactions

Learn what you need to know about your medicines to help prevent adverse drug reactions.

Medicines can treat or prevent illness and disease. However, sometimes medicines can cause problems. These problems are called adverse drug reactions. You should know what to do if you think that you or someone you take care of is having an adverse drug reaction.

Some types of food may also cause adverse drug reactions. For example, grapefruit and grapefruit juice, as well as alcohol and caffeine, may affect how drugs work. Every time your doctor prescribes a new drug, ask about possible interactions with any foods or beverages.

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No.

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Drug Allergy Information Drug Reactions ACAAI

5/12/2014
02:15 | Author: Sarah Gray

Drug reactions
Drug Allergy Information Drug Reactions ACAAI

A drug reaction is a problem caused by a drug that you or your doctor did not expect. Any prescription or non-prescription drug can cause a problem. Reactions.

An allergist is a doctor who has the specialized training and experience to find out what causes your allergies, prevent and treat symptoms, and help keep them under control. Find an allergist in your zip code and find relief.

Allergic drug reactions may cause:

A non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugor a corticosteroid (to reduce inflammation).

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Types Symptoms Treatment Other Conditions Children.

Types Symptoms Treatment Children Seasonal Anaphylaxis.

These treatments help support your blood pressure and your internal organs.

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Medications and Drug Allergic Reactions AAAAI

3/11/2014
04:00 | Author: Alex Watson

Drug reactions
Medications and Drug Allergic Reactions AAAAI

AAAAI, the experts in allergy and immunology, provide an overview of medications and drug allergic reactions.

When to See an Allergist / Immunologist If you have a history of reactions to different medications, or if you have a serious reaction to a drug, an allergist / immunologist, often referred to as an allergist, has specialized training to diagnose the problem and help you develop a plan to protect you in the future.

Everyone reacts to medications differently. One person may develop a rash while taking a certain medication, while another person on the same drug may have no adverse reaction. Does that mean the person with the rash has an allergy to that drug?

Rarely, blisters develop as a result of a drug rash.

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Drug allergy Definition - Diseases and Conditions - Mayo Clinic

1/10/2014
06:35 | Author: Sarah Gray

Drug reactions
Drug allergy Definition - Diseases and Conditions - Mayo Clinic

A drug allergy is the abnormal reaction of your immune system to a medication. Any medication — over-the-counter, prescription or herbal — is.

The most common signs and symptoms of drug allergy are hives, rash or fever. A drug allergy may cause serious reactions, including anaphylaxis, a life-threatening condition that affects multiple body systems.

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A drug allergy is the abnormal reaction of your immune system to a medication. Any medication — over-the-counter, prescription or herbal — is capable of inducing a drug allergy. However, a drug allergy is more likely with certain medications.

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A drug allergy is not the same as drug side effects, the known possible reactions that are listed on a drug label. A drug allergy is also distinct from drug toxicity caused by an overdose of medication.

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